Freezer Burn: The Invasion Of Laxdale

Poster for movie
Release Information
December 19, 2008
USA
tribute.ca
December 19, 2008
Canada
tribute.ca
Funding Sources
Act/Policy
Budget
Budget: $5,500,000
Distributors
Equinoxe Films Inc.
Film Bridge International

Production Details

Executive Producer
Kevin DeWalt
Kevin DeWalt
Kevin DeWalt
Kevin DeWalt
Kevin DeWalt
Kevin DeWalt
Kevin DeWalt
Kevin DeWalt
Josh Miller
Ellen S. Wander
Josh Miller
Producer
Paul J. Spence
David Lawrence
Grant Harvey
Grant Harvey
Grant Harvey
Grant Harvey
Kevin DeWalt
Kevin DeWalt
Josh Miller
Josh Miller
Josh Miller
Josh Miller
Line Producer
Josh Miller
Josh Miller
Director
Tom Green
Grant Harvey
Grant Harvey
Grant Harvey
Director of Photography
John Spooner
John Spooner
John Spooner
John Spooner
John Spooner
Director of Sound
John Blerot
Art Director
Shanna Orgovan
Music
Mike Shields
Mike Shields
Mike Shields
Mike Shields
Mike Shields
Mike Shields
Mike Shields
Writer
Paul J. Spence
David Lawrence
Tom Green
Grant Harvey
Barry Kloeble
Blaine Hart
Editor
Dave Backe
Cast
Len Crowther
Len Crowther
Len Crowther
Len Crowther
Marie Zydek
Jameson Trenholm
Leona Brausen
Leona Brausen
Donovan Workun
Donovan Workun
Mark Jenkins
Peter Kent
Peter Kent
Paul J. Spence
Paul J. Spence
Paul J. Spence
David Lawrence
David Lawrence
David Lawrence
Adrien Dorval
Adrien Dorval
Adrien Dorval
Adrien Dorval
David Brown
David Brown
David Brown
David Brown
David Brown
David Brown
David Brown
Scott Hylands
Scott Hylands
Scott Hylands
Scott Hylands
Scott Hylands
Scott Hylands
Scott Hylands
Scott Hylands
Scott Hylands
Scott Hylands
Scott Hylands
Scott Hylands
Scott Hylands
Scott Hylands
Scott Hylands
Scott Hylands
Sarain Boylan
Sarain Boylan
Sarain Boylan
Sarain Boylan
Sarain Boylan
Crispin Glover
Tom Green
Tom Green
Tom Green
Grant Harvey
Blaine Hart
92 minutes, 2008

This 2008 science fiction comedy from writer-producer Josh Miller uses well-worn generic conventions in order to touch lightly on questions about what makes Canada tick. We all know the plot: washed up hero is re-animated by a personal goal (his coach and his dog have been killed) and saves the world from an alien invader, thereby redeeming himself and getting “the girl” in the end.

Yes, we have seen this before, but it is the treatment that makes this film such enjoyable light entertainment. Using Hockey as a metaphor for the spiritual health of Laxdale, a small prairie town, Producer Josh Miller, Director Grant Harvey, and their co-writers, Blaine Hart and Barry Kloeble, introduce us to Bill Swanson (Tom Green), a washed up NHL hockey goon whose career was over before it began, after he took a “puck to the head.” Bill has returned home to a town that has lost its soul, having willingly leapt at the chance to sell its land to a supposed multi-national “Dutch” company offering to build a refinery and provide everyone with secure jobs. Bill’s former hockey coach, Arnie Filmore (Scot Hylands) is the only person in Laxdale who still likes and respects Bill, but Arnie has had a Roswell moment and has seen the “Dutch” businessmen for what they really are: aliens. He has discovered their purpose (to turn the Earth into an inter-galactic Club Med where earthlings will work as servants); he has also realized that the secret to destroying the invaders is to expose them to anything that is frozen. The movie has the usual supporting cast: the puck bunny, Gina Larson (Sarain Boylan); the evil alien frontman for the invasion, Vergacht (Crispin Glover); and two especially gormless “hosers,” Randy and Dwayne (Paul Spence and David Lawrence).

Like other recent films aimed at a commercial audience dominated by youth, Freezer Burn has benefitted from Telefilm Canada funding: $1.5M of the movie’s $5.5M budget. Miller, who has served as President of the Alberta Motion Picture Industries Association, on the Board of the Alberta Foundation for the Arts, and is a former Chair of the Edmonton International Film Festival Society, believes that government support is essential for the health of independent film production in Canada. Telefilm’s modest goal of raising the percentage of screen time in Canada for English-language Canadian films from 1% to 5% is partly what drives its decisions to fund films like Freezer Burn.

Commentaries


  • If the Earth must be invaded by alien capitalists wanting to use it as a sort of inter-Galactic Club Med, then the invasion might as well start in a place where people are polite and don’t question authority: Canada. But not just anywhere in Canada...

Contributed Notes