Drylanders

Release Information
November 1, 1963
Edmonton (Garneau) and 13 other theatres in Alberta starting from 30/10/63 to 04/11/63.
November 1, 1963
Swift Current, Sask.
September 25, 1963
Edmonton (Garneau) and 13 other theatres in Alberta starting from 30/10/63 to 04/11/63.
September 25, 1963
Swift Current, Sask.
Funding Sources
Act/Policy
Budget
Actual cost: $200,000
Distributors
Columbia Pictures
J.-A. Lapointe Films

Production Details

Executive Producer
John Kemeny
John Kemeny
John Kemeny
John Kemeny
Producer
William Weintraub
William Fruet
John Kemeny
John Kemeny
John Kemeny
John Kemeny
John Kemeny
John Kemeny
John Kemeny
John Kemeny
John Kemeny
John Kemeny
John Kemeny
John Kemeny
John Kemeny
John Kemeny
John Kemeny
John Kemeny
Peter Jones
Line Producer
John Kemeny
David Haber
Director
William Weintraub
William Fruet
William Fruet
William Fruet
William Fruet
William Fruet
William Fruet
William Fruet
William Fruet
William Fruet
William Fruet
Donald Haldane
Donald Haldane
Donald Haldane
Clarke Da Prato
Director of Photography
Reginald H. Morris
Reginald H. Morris
Reginald H. Morris
Reginald H. Morris
Reginald H. Morris
Reginald H. Morris
Reginald H. Morris
Reginald H. Morris
Reginald H. Morris
Reginald H. Morris
Reginald H. Morris
Reginald H. Morris
Reginald H. Morris
Reginald H. Morris
Reginald H. Morris
Reginald H. Morris
Reginald H. Morris
Director of Sound
Ron Alexander
Clarke Da Prato
Clarke Da Prato
Music
Eldon Rathburn
Eldon Rathburn
Eldon Rathburn
Eldon Rathburn
Eldon Rathburn
Eldon Rathburn
Eldon Rathburn
Eldon Rathburn
Eldon Rathburn
Eldon Rathburn
Writer
William Weintraub
William Weintraub
William Weintraub
William Fruet
William Fruet
William Fruet
William Fruet
William Fruet
Clarke Da Prato
M. Charles Cohen
M. Charles Cohen
Editor
John Kemeny
Kirk Jones
Kirk Jones
Kirk Jones
Kirk Jones
Kirk Jones
Kirk Jones
Kirk Jones
Kirk Jones
Cast
Mary Savage
William Weintraub
Lester Nixon
James B. Douglas
James B. Douglas
James B. Douglas
James B. Douglas
James B. Douglas
James B. Douglas
James B. Douglas
James B. Douglas
James B. Douglas
James B. Douglas
James B. Douglas
James B. Douglas
Frances Hyland
Frances Hyland
Frances Hyland
Frances Hyland
Frances Hyland
Frances Hyland
Frances Hyland
Frances Hyland
Frances Hyland
Irena Mayeska
Irena Mayeska
Irena Mayeska
Irena Mayeska
Irena Mayeska
Don Francks
Don Francks
Don Francks
Don Francks
Don Francks
Don Francks
Don Francks
Don Francks
Don Francks
Don Francks
Don Francks
Don Francks
Don Francks
Don Francks
Don Francks
Don Francks
Don Francks
Don Francks
Don Francks
William Fruet
69 minutes, 1961

An epic story of the opening up of the Canadian West from 1907, through the drought and depression of the thirties, and the saga of a Montréal family which stakes its future on the Prairies. In 1907, when Saskatchewan was almost empty, Daniel Greer, a clerk from Montréal, arrives with Liza, his wife, and their two sons. They have come to homestead. A bee is organized by neighbours to build them a sod hut. Faced with such spartan conditions, tension develops between Daniel and Liza who wants to return east. Still attired in bowler hat and city vest, Daniel ploughs his first furrow. He runs to get Liza when the first shoots appear. They attend a party at their neighbours, the MacPhersons. Liza changes her attitude towards the land after a talk with their hostess. But during the winter they must struggle to survive. Seven years of prosperity are succeeded by long years of drought and the depression. Colin, the older son, marries. Russell, the younger son, leaves the farm. The Greers live on hand-outs from the relief depot during the long years of the depression while other families are leaving the Prairies. In 1938, Daniel dies of a heart attack and there is tension in the family. Colin and Thora, his wife, want to start a new life away from the farm but Liza won't leave. Then, after nine years of drought, the rains come and life starts anew.

Source: Library and Archives Canada - Canadian Feature Film Database (LAC)

Commentaries


  • As the first full-length, feature film from the National Film Board (NFB) and its most expensive production to date ($200,000), you would think that Drylanders (Un autre pays) (1963) would have received more critical attention when it was released...

Contributed Notes